Ipohworld's World

Saving Yesterday For Tomorrow

blog59

Yes, that’s what I’d like to ask our local coffee drinkers out there. How come this particular bag of coffee came in 11 kilos? I always thought such goods were packed in either even numbered weights or in multiples of 5 (or basic 1 kilo or 1/2 kilo). Could it be a misprint? Or, did this factory just want to stand out and be different…by selling coffee powder in 11 kilo bags 😉

  1. Ngai C O says:

    Hi,

    I do wonder as well. The coffee beans and ground coffee that I buy come in 227 gram packs, which appears odd too. Five packs would make it to 1.135 kg.

    There are some packs that are rounded up to whole numbers like 200grms, 500grms.

    What does kopi campuran mean? Is it the ratio of different types of beans used?

    What does Gred 1 mean? It is too vague.

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi,

      felicia suggested a possible misprint at the outset.
      IKA said he picked up the poster when the factory was newly opened.

      It looked like a printing error. Of course with most Chinese operators, every cent is precious. They would not dump the posters just because of a mistake.

      A recent phone call confirmed that they sell in 1okg tins. I suspect that they use the time tested and versatile kerosene tins that became universal in holding many products from kerosene to biscuits, oil etc.

      Cut up diagonally, they make good dust pans. A listed tin hut in Australia was made entirely from the tin.

  2. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear felicia

    Yes, that’s what I’d like to ask our local coffee drinkers out there. How come this particular bag of coffee came in 11 kilos?

    Was the label found on a bag? Seems heavy at 11 kilos.

    And did you try calling the office telephone number provided on the label? Does the company no longer exist? (I can’t guess how old the label is.)

    Final question: “Mentega” is butter, yes?

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered,

      I missed the ingredients below, which comprised coffee beans, sugar, butter or more likely margarine and salt. Not sure about proportion of each ingredient used.

      When ground, the weight would definitely be less due to losses.

      It appears to be a bag of roasted coffee beans, maybe for the coffee shop, which is a high consumer. Definitely not packed for the average household.

  3. homesickforipoh says:

    I recalled mum told me many Chinese believe in “11’s or ’21’s and not round numbers.
    When red packets were given, sometimes it is given as $1.10 instead of $1.
    The extra 1 symbolises “more than enough”, a symbol of abundance and prosperity.
    So I guess the coffee packets were deliberately packed as 11 kilos instead of 10 kilos.

    BTW, I recognize the fuel capacity of my Toyota is 11.5 gallons instead of 11 gallons.
    And when I have used up to 11 gallons, the “empty fuel” lights come on.
    I believe the extra is intended to give us time to refuel or replenish.

    So I believe the coffee packaging is also meant to give us time to buy a new pack before this pack runs out.

    Just my humble two cents opinion.

    • felicia says:

      Hello Homesickforipoh,
      Hmm….what you said does make sense. Maybe this brand of coffee is deliberately packed such to give us time to buy another pack when we’re running low.

  4. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    It appears to be a bag of roasted coffee beans, maybe for the coffee shop, which is a high consumer.

    Thank you for pointing this out. I’m a little slow!

    ——

    Dear homesickforipoh

    I recalled mum told me many Chinese believe in “11′s or ’21′s and not round numbers. When red packets were given, sometimes it is given as $1.10 instead of $1. The extra 1 symbolises “more than enough”, a symbol of abundance and prosperity.

    That’s a great observation! Thank you.

    ——

    Dear Mano

    Thanks for the translation(s)!

    Also, what’s the difference between “kupu-kupu” and “rama-rama”?

    ——

    Dear felicia

    Thanks for providing the date.

  5. IKA says:

    Just a point of ipohWorld history, I collected this poster when I visited the factory in 2007, long before I had any staff to help me with this project. The factory was very operational then and the aroma of coffee was wonderful.

    2007 was the year we built our first database with the help of Tenby School IT executive and this poster was entered by my first temporary staff member from the school in December that year. That database was hacked a couple of years later and we lost a lot of stuff. A new database software came much later and we had to rebuild everything from scratch, plus add on a full years collected items that had to wait for the new database.

    We were fortunate that the new database software was sponsored by a local company iosc.net.

    Today we have a reliable back up system, Christopher and Felicia full time and a museum with three staff. We have come a long way since 11 Kilos!

    • Ipoh Remembered says:

      Dear IKA … Thanks for adding “Just a point of ipohWorld history.” It’s as interesting, and as valuable, to me as the underlying project. Please add more such notes whenever time allows.

      We have come a long way since 11 Kilos!

      Yes: 11 years, in fact!

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi IKA and Everyone at Ipohworld,

      Congratulations to 11 years and now a dedicated team to keep the passion and mission of the history of Ipoh going.

      Definitely a good start to the new year.

  6. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    felicia suggested a possible misprint at the outset. IKA said he picked up the poster when the factory was newly opened. It looked like a printing error. Of course with most Chinese operators, every cent is precious. They would not dump the posters just because of a mistake.

    You know, I think you may be right. (I had forgotten felicia‘s initial suggestion.)

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered,

      With the information available, that is the best explanation that I can offer unless someone comes forward with something else.

      I remember one posting by IpohWorld “not what you think it is” about a worn out piece of something that turns out to be a traditional ‘finger padi harvesting tool’.

      It later occurred to me after reading a few articles that it was commonly used throughout Asia. The shape of the wooden handle had to with the Rice God and the purpose of the small knife was in aiding with seed selection.

      Mano correctly identified it as a harvesting tool

  7. S.Y. says:

    Incidentally, I was at the newly open Econsave in Jelapang the other day. I saw a few brands of Kopi Campuran. They were in the same style of packing with gaudy colours (as contrasted to the 3 in 1 white coffee nowadays). I forgot to check whether the company producing them were the same. However, I noticed that they were not in 11 kilos. They were in 1 or 2 kilos only

  8. Merrill Leong says:

    There are still merchants out there who sell their wares with prices quoted in per 600 grams. The reason for this is their reluctance to move away from the kati system. 600 grams is about 1 kati in weight. So I believe that the mystery of the why of 11 kilograms may be explained in this kilogram kati conversion… 11 kgs is 22 katis. Now I need to ask why 22 kgs and not 20 kgs? ml

  9. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Merrill … You raise a good point. For example, in the US, which to this day has not really adopted the metric system (except in certain technical fields), packages in the grocery store are sometimes labelled as weighing “1 lb (453.6 grams),” which is quite amusing. And sometimes, in newspaper articles about events abroad, distances are often given as “6.2 miles” when, in fact, the writer simply converted from “10 km.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>