Ipohworld's World

Saving Yesterday For Tomorrow

This picture is a follow up to a previous blog entry.

We thank Ipoh Remembered for his untiring efforts (and creativity!) in producing this picture – complete with labels of the various landmarks in Ipoh Old Town.

blog79

(click to enlarge)

More details (also provided by Ipoh Remembered) can be found on the database entry.

  1. Ngai C O says:

    Hi Ipoh Remembered,

    Thank you for putting together the names of the buildings and road.

    The old government offices was last used as the RIMV (Registration and Inspection of Motor Vehicles) before it was pulled down to make way for the new mosque. Behind it stood a field or padang where students used to gather to take part for processions. I did have some photos but must have thrown them away many years ago in a clear out.

    Next to it was Hugh Low Street with the Police Station on the other side of the road.

    As for the RIMV, it moved to the junction with Ipoh Garden and Kg. Simee before it made its final move to Tasek Road adjourning the eastern fringes of Kg Simee.

    In its place at the junction is where the Fire Brigade is relocated from Brewster Road.

    • Ipoh Remembered says:

      Dear Ngai C O

      Thank you for putting together the names of the buildings and road.

      Well, a primary purpose was to estimate when the photo was taken, and, as you may have seen (in the attachment to database item 7948), my guess is 1937-1941.

      The old government offices was last used as the RIMV (Registration and Inspection of Motor Vehicles) before it was pulled down to make way for the new mosque. Behind it stood a field or padang where students used to gather to take part for processions.

      When you say “behind it,” do you mean between the RIMV and Club Road?

      As for the RIMV, it moved to the junction with Ipoh Garden and Kg. Simee before it made its final move to Tasek Road adjourning the eastern fringes of Kg Simee. In its place at the junction is where the Fire Brigade is relocated from Brewster Road.

      Thanks for this explanation. Do you know when the three moves took place?

      • Ngai C O says:

        Hi Ipoh Remembered,

        It meant behind the two storey wooden building and Club Road.

        I think the RIMV moved to the next location round about 1965 or later to another single storey creosoted wooden building. It then moved out to its present location in the 70s.

        It was at this second move that I took my motor cycle test using a Honda Cub and subsequently car test with a Morris Minor.

        However my late brother in law took his motor cycle test at the old building or thereabout.

        As for the Fire Brigade, I believe it moved out of Brewster Road in the late 70s.

  2. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    You mentioned “a field or padang where students used to gather to take part for processions.” If, as you say, this field was between the old RIMV and Club Road, here are some articles about the area:

    http://www.ipohworld.org/2009/11/13/the-memorial-park/
    http://www.ipohworld.org/2014/07/16/remember-memorial-park/

    The first of these articles specifies an Anderson Road location, but that’s an error.

    I commented on the second article. Please let me know if you remember more (or differently!) than I do.

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered,

      I cannot recall the fountain as yet. I took part in a procession in which the gathering point was the field where the mosque is. Round about 1964. Maybe it was built after that.

      We then set off along Hugh Low Street towards town or the Ipoh Padang.

  3. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    I cannot recall the fountain as yet. I took part in a procession in which the gathering point was the field where the mosque is. Round about 1964. Maybe it was built after that.

    The fountain and associated landscaping were completed by early 1962. In 1964, the year of your procession, there was still no mosque, so the field was still there, but the fountain was also there. Construction of the mosque began in 1966 and was completed by 1968, by which time the fountain area had been turned into the car-park that it still is today. Some details are here:

    http://www.ipohworld.org/2014/07/16/remember-memorial-park/#comment-134482

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered,

      Looking at the picture again, I doubt the background was Club Road as it would face the Railway Station.

      Neither was it facing the Post Office. Nor facing the two storey wooden building behind nor the Police Station across Hugh Low Street.

      I am not sure at this moment.

      • Ngai C O says:

        Hi Ipoh Remembered,

        I did an Instant Street View search, which showed the buildings resembling the Police Station. So the background was the Police Station.

        I still cannot make out the fountain. Perhaps, the procession was much earlier and not 1964.

          • Ngai C O says:

            Hi Ipoh Remembered,

            Most likely Merdeka Day. Could well be Malaysia Day in 1963 because we always gathered at the Ipoh Padang for Merdeka.

            When the king and queen of Siam visited many years earlier, we were in primary school. We lined up under the huge rain trees along Maxwell Road.

  4. SYBIL de ROQUIGNY-IRAGNE says:

    Hi Ngai C O, Thanks for the information about the Road Transport buildings at different periods. My father was the SRIMV.

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Sybil,

      Thank you for sharing with readers your dad was Senior RIMV.

      The whole dept. from top to bottom was predominantly staffed by Chinese. The big change came as staff retired and and when the Affirmative Action kicked in during the 70s. By the late 80s, one might see the odd Chinese and Indian or other race.

      Last year when I went to renew my licence, only one race manned the counters whilst the customers on the other side were more like the true representation of Malaysia.

      One now has a choice of how to renew the licence. A visit to the Dept, at designated Post Offices or online.

      When I took my motor cycle test, there were two main practical tests – getting the bike through a figure of 8 and the emergency brake. If one skidded or fell at the emergency test, that was it.

      As for the car test, the correct hand signal was a must. It is still legal although it does not form part of the test. Vintage cars, horse carriages and cyclists have to use the hand signals.

      When the dept. moved to the stadium precinct and after the final move to the fringes of Kg. Simee, it could take up to half a day to get the licence renewed.

      This was due to a sudden and huge surge of motorcycle and car ownership that the dept. was overwhelmed and was struggling to cope.

      Tensions would often erupt between the staff and customers. For me who refused to pay a runner to renew the licence, I had to jostle with these professionals, who jumped the queue. The professional in front of me might have 10 or so licences to renew for all you know. It was very chaotic scene most of the time.

      • S.Y. says:

        Reminds me of the time I learnt to drive in 1969. Costs me $65 only. I had to learnt all the hand signals. To turn right, I had to put up the right hand straight. As I was turning, I had to engage the gears (no automatic gears those days) and used my left hand. My driving instructor asked me “who is to hold the steering wheel?” Anyone remember whether you have to give hand signal to turn left and if so, how to do it?

  5. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    The old government offices was last used as the RIMV (Registration and Inspection of Motor Vehicles) before it was pulled down to make way for the new mosque. […] As for the RIMV, it moved to the junction with Ipoh Garden and Kg. Simee before it made its final move to Tasek Road adjourning the eastern fringes of Kg Simee.

    Your memory of these RIMV locations in Ipoh reminds me that before there was an RIMV, there was an ROV (“Registrar of Vehicles”), at first part of the Kinta Sanitary Board and later part of the state government.

    As the old title implies, the ROV started out by registering gharries, bullock carts, rickshas, and the like. Of course, motor vehicles were included as soon as they made their appearance.

    The old ROV office was on Lahat Road, not far from ACS and across the street from an old foundry. Years later the CEB took over the site (and I think Tenaga Nasional is still there today).

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered,

      I never thought about pre RIMV.

      Any idea when bullock carts and ricksaws were required to be registered?

      I believe some elderly people in their 80s and 90s, who were driving before the introduction of the driving test, were never required to take the test but still holds a valid driving licence.

      Yes, I do remember the Central Electricity Board next to the ACS. and the Public Works Dept next to it. At the back facing the railway line were their stores and workshops. The were extremely efficient and well run to restore power after thunderstorms and keep the drains from clogging.

      In those days power outages during thunderstorms were frequent unlike today where such incidents are rare due to vastly improved systems in operation.

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