Ipohworld's World

Saving Yesterday For Tomorrow
  1. Ngai C O says:

    Hi felicia,

    Well, I read about platform tickets in a newspaper article related to railway stations some two weeks back but did not give much thought to it.

    Today you have produced one.

    There is an article on wikipedia about Platform Tickets.

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Again,

      I wonder when the station ticket in Ipoh was discontinued or is it still being used for that matter.

      We have been able to wonder into the railway platform in Ipoh and KL Sentral at will all these years without being hindered. From 1950s onwards.

      I think the Ipoh station stopped allowing non passengers to the platform about two years ago. Prior to that, my sister and I saw see my brother off to KL.

  2. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Today, we’re showcasing a platform ticket. :)

    Thanks, felicia.

    My usual first question: any inkling of when this ticket was issued?

    I notice the “r” in “platform.” It’s interesting.

    Thanks again.

    • IKA says:

      Unfortunately there is no indication of date on the ticket, However the one clue must be it cost 20 Sen not cents. When did we move away from cents?

      I have lived in Ipoh for 18 years and never bought a platform ticket, but maybe that is because there was no enforcement.

      Am I right in thinking that KTM (as on ticket) became KTMB in 1992?

      Finally, I picked up the ticket (literally) in an abandoned shophouse where the first floor was exactly as it had been left when the tenants vacated it in the 80′s.

  3. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear IKA

    Unfortunately there is no indication of date on the ticket

    Why am I not surprised?

    However the one clue must be it cost 20 Sen not cents. When did we move away from cents?

    As late as the early 1970s, Malaysia and Singapore used the same currency: dollars and cents. In 1973 Malaysia decided — on extremely short notice — to separate its currency from Singapore’s, so then for a time there were “Malaysian dollars” and “Singapore dollars.” Throughout, the terms ringgit and sen were also used, especially in Malay but also sometimes in English.

    Then in 1975 the Malaysian Currency (Ringgit) Act was passed and, with it, official usage switched completely to ringgit and sen. Unofficial usage continued as before for a time, but, by now, perhaps it, too, has switched over completely. (You’d know better than I.)

    ——

    I have lived in Ipoh for 18 years and never bought a platform ticket, but maybe that is because there was no enforcement.

    I don’t know when things changed. In the old days, in Ipoh and elsewhere, you bought platform tickets at a window, just as you’d buy train tickets. Later, at least for platform tickets, there were vending machines: I think there were two of them at the Ipoh Station even into the early ’70s — but that’s a long time ago now.

    ——

    Am I right in thinking that KTM (as on ticket) became KTMB in 1992?

    I don’t know precisely but it sounds about right. There was some talk in those days about the government selling off KTM. It didn’t actually happen (at least not then) but in preparing for it there might have been a change of legal status and official name. I’m sorry I don’t remember the details.

    ——

    Finally, I picked up the ticket (literally) in an abandoned shophouse where the first floor was exactly as it had been left when the tenants vacated it in the 80′s.

    Wow. You’re unstoppable! Thanks for all you do.

    And yes, if we recall that sen became official in 1975, then I suppose it’s fair to say the ticket most likely was purchased after that and before the shophouse was abandoned.

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