Ipohworld's World

Saving Yesterday For Tomorrow
  1. Ngai C O says:

    Hi,

    Happy New Year everyone.

    Not much is aired about the Dog Year.

    What are the fortunes/otherwise does it bring for the coming year?

    Personally to me, it is a celebration of the tradition and something to talk about. It is just another year whether it be a pig, snake, tiger etc.

    Other people may have their own views.

  2. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Happy Chinese New Year, ipohWorld!

    If any of you are planning to be born in this Year of the Earth Dog, please make sure to be smart, loyal, and gentle for the rest of your life!

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered,

      Barking dogs seldom bite. Is that true?

      Do you have a favourite dog?

      My favourite dog was when I was a kid, maybe 6 years old.

      It bit a burglar who stole some chicken in the wee hours of the morning. My father had it put down because of the incident.

      My eldest sister loved dogs because of this one. She kept one at a time when she retired until recently.

      Apart from the first one, I have never had any affinity because one had to keep it indoors in the temperate zone and also to take it out to do its stuff and exercise.

      My son likes dogs, cats and hamsters but I have none of it.

      I hate cats because they pooh in other peoples’s gardens and it is very smelly. One just cannot control them from climbing over the fence. Hate, Hate, Hate.

  3. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    Here’s a true story.

    A policeman shot a dog because he thought it had rabies. A few days later, he was bitten by his daughter’s dog — and then his daughter’s dog died, of rabies.

  4. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    I was saddened to hear about the loss of your childhood pet. It doesn’t seem fair that it had to be put down after having caught an intruder, but I guess biting is a no-no especially if there are young children around. Was it difficult for you to cope with the loss of a pet in these circumstances?

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered,

      I suppose my dad thought it be a better precaution since he bit someone. He was very lovely and followed me where ever I went like a guardian.

      As for the man, whom the unfortunate dog bit, he must be a carrier. Are you sure it was rabies and not other virus?

      I am confounded because the virus is carried in the saliva and thus passed on via a bite.

      More dog story. When I was a kid living in a village, one had to take extra care owning a sucullent dog. It might end up as dog curry or dog stew. It was a very common practice that was brought from China. Some dogs were deliberately bred for human consumption.

      Korea had a notoriety for it until recently. I think the younger generations are moving away from dog consumption.

  5. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    As for the man, whom the unfortunate dog bit, he must be a carrier. Are you sure it was rabies and not other virus? I am confounded because the virus is carried in the saliva and thus passed on via a bite.

    Am I sure what virus it was? No, as the events occurred many, many years ago, and by now I am not completely sure about any aspect. And it’s certainly possible the two dogs had met before the policeman got himself involved!

    More dog story. When I was a kid living in a village, one had to take extra care owning a sucullent dog. It might end up as dog curry or dog stew. It was a very common practice that was brought from China. Some dogs were deliberately bred for human consumption.

    As you know, Ipoh was, from the very beginning, a colonial town. Long before the British arrived, there were small settlements of Malays in the area, and even a few Chinese settlements, but there was no real town until years after Pangkor.

    I mention it because, by the time they arrived, the British not only hadn’t eaten dog meat themselves for a thousand years, they also found the practice completely abhorrent and did not allow it in their colonies. Already by the late 19th century in the Straits Settlements there were local chapters of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, first in Singapore then in Malacca and elsewhere.

    And yet in Ipoh, for decades, even after the Second World War, if you knew where to go, you could buy cooked dog meat (including curry or stew, as you said). There were a number of hawker stalls in New Town with signs that said “3 plus 6” in Chinese characters — and, as you probably know, in Ipoh that’s a clever way to hint at “dog.”

    Korea had a notoriety for it until recently. I think the younger generations are moving away from dog consumption.

    It still happens in China. From time to time a cook-book from the mainland arrives in Hong Kong book-shops, only to cause near-riots when the local elite, long acculturated to British norms, discover in their pages recipes for dog meat.

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered,

      Thanks a lot. It is a very interesting read. We can safely agree the circumstances of the dog’s death remains a mystery.

      One would not get dog food if we ask for 3 plus 6 at a Chinese restaurent. Maybe we would be told there is no such menu.

      It did not dawn on me at the time in the village that dog consumption was banned by the British as I was still a kid. The dog eaters preferred young dogs. As there were no British in the village, people could pretty do anything.

      I had seen a Chinese man skin a monkey for cooking.

      The nearest I went to eating something else was civet cat stew. My dad trapped it with a cage. He put lots of Chinese medicinal herbs to the cooking. Whilst my youngest uncle loved it, I had it only once and cannot recall how it tasted.

      Remember villagers used to stack fire wood for cooking. In between the interstices, mice liked to build their nests. Many older and illiterate villagers would swallow the live newly born hairless critters in one go with a beer. They said it was an aphrodisiac. I saw the practice frequently.

      I had also seen some peers swallow, queen termites.

      They were definitely protein rich food.

  6. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    What a varied diet you encountered in your youth! And calling it “exotic” would not be accurate, because you saw it all around you.

    About dog meat: Yes, it was completely unavailable in Ipoh’s markets, and as far as I know it was never served in restaurants — not even in those special establishments where you could order such delicacies as bird’s-nest soup and shark’s-fin soup. The British mostly did not care for these delicacies, either, but still they would allow locals to enjoy — so long as no one cast a hungry eye on Rover or Fido!

    And yet those few enterprising street-hawkers in New Town, with their curries and their stews, they knew how to send coded phonetic signals to interested customers.

    I think the practice had died out by the ’60s or ’70s, but I’m not entirely sure.

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