Ipohworld's World

Saving Yesterday For Tomorrow

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Remember the time when palm trees lined up Club Road? Neither do I  ;) Jokes aside, I’m sure those trees stood there for quite a while, before bowing to ‘development’. Since the Town Hall can be seen in the background, I’m making a wild guess as to the date of this postcard; I’m thinking…1920? Perhaps the experts out there could correct me..

  1. Ngai C O says:

    Hi felicia,

    Club Road was probably named after the Ipoh Royal Club further down the road.

    The vintage car pointed the direction of about 1920s or thereabout.

    The palm trees were young but still around in 1960 as I can clearly recall. They have a typical lifespan of about 80 to 100 years, and tend to die after flowering towards end of life.

    This specie of palm was widely grown in Ipoh at one time. One could see it almost everywhere – MGS, ACS, Anderson School, along roads etc

  2. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear felicia

    I’m making a wild guess as to the date of this postcard; I’m thinking…1920?

    Without looking at a higher-resolution image, circa 1920 seems a reasonable estimate.

  3. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    Thanks very much for the information about the life expectancy of those palm trees. Do you happen to know the actual species name?

    And yes, I agree that those palms lined Club Road until at least 1960. You could even say that, for a while, Club Road was Club Avenue!

    Anyway, I wonder what happened to the palms.

    Club Road was probably named after the Ipoh Royal Club further down the road.

    Yes, although the “Royal” part of the Club’s moniker is much newer.

    And before the road was called “Club Road,” it was called “Hospital Road,” because it’s where Ipoh’s first hospital stood, near where the Railway Station stands today.

    And before the road was called “Hospital Road,” one part of it was called “Kuala Kangsar Road” and the other part was called “Batu Gajah Road” — for obvious reasons. And again, the central point, where these two roads met, was near where the Railway Station stands today.

    Similarly, before the length of Hugh Low Street was so-named, that road used to be called Gopeng Road — again, for obvious reasons. And then Sir Hugh’s name was given to that part of the road which extends (now) from the Railway Station to Ipoh’s most famous fountain.

    So, to summarize: Kuala Kangsar Road, Batu Gajah Road, and Gopeng Road all used to meet at the point where Ipoh’s Railway Station now stands. I suppose this fact must sound strange, maybe even bizarre, to younger people!

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi felicia and Ipoh Remembered,

      Quick off the mark can have drawbacks. So I decided to take a pause.

      Yes, Royal came later but I would not bother to find out as it is pretty insignificant

      I erroneously quoted a palm native to Madagascar.
      My apologies.

      The palm in question is native to Cuba, called Royal Palm or Roystonea regia. It does not die after flowering.

      It is commonly used as a landscaping plant; therefore fitting and most appropriate to have been planted to line the road that separated the Town Hall and the Railway Station to break the monotony and provide symmetry. The eventual height of about a hundred feet and the fact it lined a long stretch of the road matches the height and width of the buildings perfectly.

      Instant Street view shows a few such trees are dotted here and there and look rather unhealthy. The landscape looks rather barren and empty.

      Thanks to Wikipedia, the leaves can be used as thatch, the young growing crown in salad and soup and the seeds as fodder for pigs. It is said pigs fed on the seeds produce the best lard. Bear in mind the fat content in the seed is about 21 %.

      Talking about pigs, it used to be reared in villages and outlying areas of Ipoh near to the Pinji River, Sungai Pari and the Kinta River as cottage industries. The rivers acted as a conduit to dispose of the effluent. They were fed mainly with banana leaves, stewed banana stem and other waste food discarded by restaurants. Hence pork tasted like pork unlike the present mass farming using processed pig feed, antibiotic and hormone injections in overcrowded enclosures.

      In villages, one might come across pig farmers walking the sow to look for people wanting to breed.

      Pigs are castrated whilst very young to prevent pork taint that puts people off.

      Lastly, thanks for sharing your memory of the road names that we did not know before. At least you have placed a marker in history before it is completely lost.

      After all, I guess history also depends very much on anecdotal information.

      And many things happen behind the scenes of daily life which we take for granted but are an essential part of the fabric

  4. IKA says:

    Yes it all makes sense to me Ipoh Rememnered, but these days with Road Naming Committees all the common sense seems to have gone in favour of honouring our Royals. For example the road that leads to Gopeng, Gopeng Road, is now named after our Sultan.

    Thus all legal documentation relating to Gopeng Road should be annotated with the new name. I just do not understand the strategy.

    • Ipoh Remembered says:

      Well, considering that a part of Gopeng Road was re-named after Sir Hugh Low … I suppose there must have been formalities to deal with then as well, though probably not so many in a very young town.

      When was Hugh Low Street first called by that name? There’s a blog-post here entitled “Hugh Low Street, Ipoh 1887″ … but that would have been two years before Sir Hugh retired …

      Is there in the database some record of these early names for Club Road? One could write something up … as time allows.

      • IKA says:

        The name of the 1887 street was only intended to indicate its location. I doubt if the road actually had a name then – unless somebody knows better!

        No, we have no record in the database of the earlier names of Club Road. There is just not enough time for my limited team to do everything which is why we plead for articles from others but rarely get them.

        • Ipoh Remembered says:

          Dear IKA

          The name of the 1887 street was only intended to indicate its location. I doubt if the road actually had a name then – unless somebody knows better!

          Gopeng Road.

          No, we have no record in the database of the earlier names of Club Road. There is just not enough time for my limited team to do everything which is why we plead for articles from others but rarely get them.

          Other than the comment I posted above (February 23, 2018 at 7:14 pm), what would you include in such an article? Let me know!

  5. ika says:

    I see this as a fairly short and simple factual article that provides the different road names against (approximate) dates and boundaries of the roads as they changed. It could be based om S. Durai Raja Singam who produced Ipoh Street Names in a book in 1939. An example follows. It did not come with a map as far as we know.

    “Hugh Low Street
    (Club Road to Tambun Road and Gopeng Road Junction)

    Named after Sir Hugh Low GCMG who was Resident of Perak from 1877-1889). An uncle of Sir Hugh Clifford. The immense prosperity of Perak had its beginning during his time.”

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