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Saving Yesterday For Tomorrow

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The form above is that of a Hire and Purchase Agreement issued by the Eu Tong Sen Finance (Malaya) Ltd. for the purchase of an Austin 7 Super Saloon in the year 1962 at the cost price of $4338.25.

How many of you have heard of the Eu Tong Sen Finance Ltd?  We’d like to hear from you.

Austin Seven 1959

Courtesy of one of our blog reader and contributor, this advertisement for the Austin Se7en was provided to us by Ipoh Remembered.

  1. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Christopher

    Never mind Eu Tong Sen Finance (M) Ltd. — let’s get to the important stuff!

    That “Austin 7” Mr. Chang bought for $4338.25 in 1962 was, in fact, a Mini.

    When the Mini was introduced in the UK and abroad in 1959, it was first sold under the names “Austin Seven” and “Morris Mini-Minor.”

    The original Austin Seven was a pre-war car; and the Morris Minor was sold from the late ’40s through the early ’70s.

    ——

    One other thing of note: Mr. Chang lived in Canning Garden in 1962. At that time, there were only about 15 roads in the entire housing estate. More roads and more houses were built in subsequent years; and Ipoh Garden was developed after that.

  2. Mano says:

    That was a revelation, Ipoh Remembered!
    I never knew that the Mini Minor was initially sold as the Austin 7.
    Now, from the important stuff to sidetracking.
    Both the Morris Minor and Mini Minor were the brainchild of Sir Alec Issigonis. He went on to design the Morris/Austin 1100 and the 1800.
    One of my favourite read is the Classic and Sports Car magazine. Sir Alec Issigonis was featured in one of their issues where they published drawings that he did on the table cloth whilst having his breakfast. One of which was the design for the unmistakable door handle of the Morris Minor.
    He laid down the foundation for the ‘British’ design in cars. Prior to that they were more the miniature versions of the Yanks’.

  3. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Mano

    I never knew that the Mini Minor was initially sold as the Austin 7.

    Yes, for a few years, and then in Malaya it was officially “Mini-Minor” for a while, although most people just referred to it as a “Mini.”

    If you search the Internet for “Austin Seven” or “Austin Se7en” specifying 1959, you will likely find photographs and other information.

    Plus notice that the receipt shown above refers to an “Austin Seven Super.” That model, properly called a Super Seven, was a souped-up version first available in 1961: the starter and ignition were combined, some gauges were added to the dash, the seats were noticeably more comfortable, and there was a bit more chrome. Top speed was in the low-to-mid-80s (miles per hour, of course).

    (I’ve sent Christopher scanned copies of (1) a 1959 advertisement for the new Austin Seven; and (2) a 1961 advertisement for the improved Super Seven; on the off-chance that he finds them useful, albeit not as useful as he would have found comments about Eu Tong Sen Finance.)

    One of my favourite read is the Classic and Sports Car magazine. Sir Alec Issigonis was featured in one of their issues where they published drawings that he did on the table cloth whilst having his breakfast. One of which was the design for the unmistakable door handle of the Morris Minor.

    I don’t remember seeing that article: it seems I missed a big treat!

    [Issigonis] laid down the foundation for the ‘British’ design in cars. Prior to that they were more the miniature versions of the Yanks’.

    And not only British design: when the Peugeot 204 and the Autobianchi Primula appeared a few years after the Mini, Issigonis himself considered them a flattering imitation (although, even then, the Mini was still better in some respects).

    But then, come to think of it, you probably already knew that!;)

    Not entirely, plus I’m presumably not your only reader!

    Which reminds me: we spoke recently about an Ipoh person I’d been thinking about for years, and you said something that helped me recall his first name; and, consequently, I was able to contact him — after forty years!

    THANK YOU!

    • Mano says:

      ‘…I was able to contact him — after forty years!’

      One of the greatest moments in life is catching up with a long lost friend. I am so glad to be of help, Ipoh remembered!

    • IKA says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered, one of the great bonuses in running ipohWorld is just what has happened to you. Over the past 13 years we have re-connected dozens of people and put families back together after many years of separation. Some of the stories are amazing and we are so happy when we hear of these successes.

      May your re-connection bring you happiness.

  4. Merrill Leong says:

    I first noticewd the Mini in the late 60s when my uncle was racing around in a Mini Cooper S. There was the Mini Cooper of course, but the top prize went to the “S”. British Leyland, the company that amalgamated 5 British car manufacturers introduced the Mini under 5 different brands. I remember seeing the Mini under the brand names of Wolseley, Riley, Morris, Austin and MG.

  5. Mano says:

    Coincidentally, just the day before yesterday, a customer friend of mine brought his Morris Mini over to show me.
    It’s a 1961 ‘barn find’ he had restored to it’s original state bar the two front seats. Yes, the rear seat is the original 57 years ago and, get this, the car has done a ridiculous five thousand miles!!!

  6. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Merrill Leong

    I first noticewd the Mini in the late 60s when my uncle was racing around in a Mini Cooper S. There was the Mini Cooper of course, but the top prize went to the “S”.

    John Cooper was an amazing engineer. Even before he beefed up the Mini, he had virtually invented Formula One racing.

    Just two weeks ago I mentioned the scion of Changkat Kinding: Bill Ferguson (see footnote 6). Among John’s early admirers, in the late ’40s Bill was probably the first to bring “Cooper” racing cars to Malaya. The early ones were actually built out of World War Two military surplus!

    Mano

    Yes, the rear seat is the original 57 years ago and, get this, the car has done a ridiculous five thousand miles!!!

    I had to read that several times to convince myself that you meant “five thousand miles” as in “only 5000 over 57 years,” or less than a quarter of a mile per day.

    That’s not a car: c’est un bijou!

    ‘…I was able to contact him — after forty years!’

    One of the greatest moments in life is catching up with a long lost friend. I am so glad to be of help, Ipoh remembered!

    It was the grandchild of a long-departed friend, and, now that I think about it, the gap was nearly six decades, not a mere four! Thanks again.

    IKA:

    Some of the stories are amazing and we are so happy when we hear of these successes.

    Yes, I’ve seen such comments posted, and I imagine they are only the tip of the iceberg, so to speak.

    Thanks to you and felicia and Christopher yet again for all you do to help keep Ipoh’s heritage alive and vibrant.

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