Ipohworld's World

Saving Yesterday For Tomorrow
  1. Shen Ooi says:

    Whilst I understand that this is the main Market built by Yau Tet Shin, the headline of “Yau Tet Shin’s Market” brings forth a different memory for me. I (and perhaps others of my generation) will always think of the the Octagonal building (Pak Kok Lau in Cantonese or Pasar Bulat in Malay) in Cowan St as Yau Tet Shin’s Market. Sadly that building has been demolished and a rather ugly monstrosity has taken its place.

    • Ipoh Remembered says:

      Dear felicia

      Yes, it’s the Yau Tet Shin Market.

      No, it’s not.

      This market on Laxamana Road was built by the government, as all three of Ipoh’s main markets were.

      As Shen Ooi suggests above, Yau Tet Shin built his market on Cowan Street. That was ages ago — and then the town re-built it on the same spot in the early ’60s.

      (Yes, I am working on a write-up for you that will correct the errors in the database.)

      • IKA says:

        Ipoh Remembered.
        Now I am more confused than ever about the chronology, builders, and siting of the Ipoh markets and I really need to have that article on this as we have discussed.

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi,

      If I am not mistaken, this was the New Town Market built by Yau Tet Shin in 1909 to replace the old one, which was in Old Town, where Kinta Heights stand.

      One can easily confuse this market with the later Yau Tet Shin Market along the same road as Jubilee Park.

  2. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear Ngai C O

    If I am not mistaken, this was the New Town Market built by Yau Tet Shin in 1909 to replace the old one, which was in Old Town, where Kinta Heights stand.

    No, this was the New Town market built by the government in 1930 to replace Ipoh’s (second) main market, which was in Old Town, where Kinta Heights stand.

    • Ngai C O says:

      Hi Ipoh Remembered,

      Thanks for correcting me as I based the information from an unconfirmed source and anecdotally.

      I shall await for your confirmation to put things in perspective.

  3. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear felicia

    One other thing for now:

    You can also see some of the shophouses in Cockman Street.

    No, Cockman Street is not visible. It’s behind the camera.

    The shop-houses you see on the left are on Laxamana Road. On their left are Foo San Restaurant and Foong Seong Villa, neither of which is shown in the photograph; and on their right behind the market you can see part of the old Lok Lum Club next to the Fire Station on Brewster Road. Meanwhile, the shop-houses you see on the right are on Foo Choo Choon Street. Some of the coconut trees you see are on the banks of the Kinta River and behind them, far in the background, you see the Kledang Hills.

    The photograph was most likely taken from the back of a shop-house on Togo Street. There was a row of shop-houses there designed by the firm of Keys & Dowdeswell. As Ngai C O and I have discussed here before, that row of shop-houses still stands today.

    Togo Street was re-named Cockman Street after the war.

    As for when the photograph was taken, I’d need to look at a higher-resolution image before venturing a guess.

  4. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Dear IKA

    Now I am more confused than ever about the chronology, builders, and siting of the Ipoh markets and I really need to have that article on this as we have discussed.

    Sorry for the confusion. Happy to help.

    In fact, I’m working on a couple of documents for you. I’ll send you a note detailing which high-resolution photographs I’ll need. (If you like, you can start by sending the one displayed above.)

  5. Ruth Iversen Rollitt says:

    Yes this is the market where I used to shop. Near my father’s Telephone exchange and what used to be cold Storage! I left Ipoh in 1966 and it was still there – but part of it burnt down some years later and a new market was built – but some of the old halls remained. The street at the was Cockman Street and the other one was the one with a lot of lovely shops selling all sorts of household goods and our grocer: Universal Stores.

  6. Ipoh Remembered says:

    Ruth Iversen Rollitt says:

    [This market was near] my father’s Telephone exchange and what used to be cold Storage!

    Yes, that’s right.

    The street at the was Cockman Street and the other one was the one with a lot of lovely shops selling all sorts of household goods and our grocer: Universal Stores.

    Cockman Street is not visible in the photograph but you’re right about the Universal Store, of course.

    The shops on the left of the photograph are on Laxamana Road. The shops on the right are on Foo Choo Choon Street. The Universal Store was on the latter, near the intersection with the former, the proprietor having taken occupancy between the wars, very after the street was built in 1930. I believe the family may still be in business in Ipoh, but likely not on Foo Choo Choon Street.

    (A note for felicia: A receipt from the Universal Store is mentioned in database item 9028 but for some reason no photograph is visible; and similar photographs are not visible in item 9030.)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>